The saga continues–complete with storm

WARNING: LOTS AND LOTS OF PICTURES AHEAD! 🙂

I failed to include a picture of the apricot halves in the dryer. You can’t see them real well, but we had 4-5 trays full of fruit. It took us almost two days to dry them and given the cost of electricity, we decided it wasn’t worth it at this point to dry more of them.

It was hard to wait until they were dry.

It was hard to wait until they were dry.

We continue to get 6-7 okra pods every other day. They are nice and tender and I am slicing them into a bag to freeze for a special treat this winter. There are more coming on so hopefully we will increase the amount that we get.

This afternoon while I continued my day on my feet (and boy are they sore), I put together a cobbler of frozen fruit and dough underneath. We will serve this for dessert tomorrow night.

You can see bits of ice on some of the slices.

You can see bits of ice on some of the slices.

Even though you can’t see all the fruit, there are frozen peaches on top (my last bag), frozen sliced strawberries underneath, and frozen blueberries underneath the strawberries. On the very bottom is the dough. When this is baked, the dough pushes up through the fruit and juice and makes a nice accompaniment to the fruit. After taking this picture, I sprinkled a wee bit of nutmeg over the peaches and a wee bit of sugar. Then it was off to the 375 ̊ oven to bake for 45-50 minutes. I will warm it up before supper tomorrow night so that we can enjoy it warm.

Our squashes are putting on fruit.

Summer squash

Summer squash

From left to right: Mexican squash (or so I’m told), zucchini squash, yellow squash, and another zucchini. We had a couple more yellow squash but they were breaded and fried yesterday. I will try to avoid the Mexican squash seeds next spring as I don’t like their huge seeds and little meat. They are not tender even though I picked them VERY young. We still ate the fried squash but it wasn’t the same as usual.

Last night DH, DD, and I had just finished supper when a windstorm/thunderstorm blew in with lots of bluster. DS was helping out at VBS so we rushed out to put his chickens in their coop as the wind was really strong. DD and I went out first because we thought we could get them in, but we soon had to go get DH to keep them in while we “herded the flock”. As we chased them around, which DD is very good at, it began to rain large, VERY COLD drops. The coolness felt good because we were running, but DH didn’t wear a shirt and so he got quite cold. The temperature dropped, the rain fell, and the wind kicked up quite a storm. Finally we got them all in but the white golden sex link rooster. DD decided that he just wanted to run, so she gave him a run for his money. Fortunately for her but unfortunately for him, she can outrun him, so he soon gave up and went inside. By that time we were all drenched, but DD and I had so much fun chasing them. DH thought we should leave the ones outside that wouldn’t go in, but we didn’t because we didn’t want anything happening to DS’s chickens.

This afternoon when I finally had a few minutes to survey the garden and determine if there was any damage in the garden, I found several of my tomato plants bent over and their stakes out of the ground. I grabbed the waxed string and asked the kids to get some scissors and DH’s hammer from the garage so that I could begin repair and retie. Most all of the tomato plants had vine that needed to be tied higher to the stake, so with DS’s help, I began tying them up. Some of them were really heavy because they are starting to be covered in tomatoes as well as more blossoms. The ones in these pictures were somewhat shielded by the corn, but to the right was one that was lying over my okra. I tried to stake it up but it took me quite awhile as the ground was hard so the stake would not go into the ground even though we had had rain. The ground was already dry at the surface of the garden.

 

The tomato plants are getting almost as tall as the corn.

The tomato plants are getting almost as tall as the corn.

The rain helped the green beans grow. I will have more to pick sometime this weekend. The cabbage heads are also getting tighter but are not ready to pick.

The heads are getting bigger.

The heads are getting bigger.

The chickens will enjoy all they can get from us, but I am hoping to make a batch or two of coleslaw.

I've never grown these before, but they require very little care while you tend the rest.

I’ve never grown these before, but they require very little care while you tend the rest.

My black turtle beans are growing nicely. Unfortunately it looks like the weeds are too, so next week we will have to weed through the garden.

It will be so nice to see how many potatoes we get.

It will be so nice to see how many potatoes we get.

The potatoes are still growing and some are putting on new flowers. The tops are healthy and even putting on a few more blossoms. The kale is still looking good and putting on new growth when I snap it off to feed the chickens.

Next week I need to cut the kale really short and see how it grows back.

Next week I need to cut the kale really short and see how it grows back.

 

Carrot fronds casting shadows in the early evening.

Carrot fronds casting shadows in the early evening.

I hope that the carrots will continue to do well in the ground until after the first freeze. You can’t see them real well in this picture, but there is a good crop.

Pretty and lush!

Pretty and lush!

This is a close up of the butter crunch lettuce. It isn’t growing a whole lot right now, but with the heat we have had, I’m not surprised. Still, it looks good and the chickens will eventually enjoy it.

Here are a few pictures of the chickens.

Pollo Blanco has grown up--mostly white with a few light tan and gold feathers. He's very gentle so far.

Pollo Blanco has grown up–mostly white with a few light tan and gold feathers. He’s very gentle so far.

One of the three golden sex link hens. They lay small dark brown eggs.

One of the three golden sex link hens. They lay small dark brown eggs.

Left to right counter-clockwise: Mr. Astralorp Rooster (he's the dominant one), an Astralorp hen, a black Sexlink hen with golden feathers on chest, and Pollo Blanco. The roosters get along so far, thankfully.

Left to right counter-clockwise: Mr. Astralorp Rooster (he’s the dominant one), an Astralorp hen, a black Sexlink hen with golden feathers on chest, and Pollo Blanco. The roosters get along so far, thankfully.

A better picture of Mr. Astralorp Rooster (on the left). When he is in the sunshine his emerald green tail feathers sparkle. He's really handsome!

A better picture of Mr. Astralorp Rooster (on the left). When he is in the sunshine his emerald green tail feathers sparkle. He’s really handsome!

Another picture showing the lovely colors and markings of the golden Sexlink hen.

Another picture showing the lovely colors and markings of the golden Sexlink hen.

"I'm going to sneak behind this board for a nap before anyone sees me." This buff Orpington likes to sneak between the board and the fence and sleep.

“I’m going to sneak behind this board for a nap before anyone sees me.” This buff Orpington likes to sneak between the board and the fence and sleep.

They have grown up quite nicely and even the roosters are nice. They make sure that their hens get plenty to eat and first pick before they start in on the scraps. They were enjoying some deli rye bread from Franz’s outlet store. I am able to pick up day old bread there for the chickens at $2.00 for 5-6 loaves. That combined with grass clippings was making a real treat for them this evening.

The respite from the heat and sun provided by this canopy also helps keep the living room cooler.

The respite from the heat and sun provided by this canopy also helps keep the living room cooler.

This canopy provides shade on our back patio. Since GPID reinforced it, we were anxious to see how it would do through a windstorm. The canvas flew up at the corners, however we were able to pull it back down once the rain and wind stopped. Thankfully the metal framework held up nicely with the reinforcement. No bent and broken frame this time.

I finished my first granny square blanket and will need to lay it out—maybe tomorrow—to get a good picture. The log cabin blanket I had been knitting has been frogged and I am starting over on it using the same granny square idea. The colors are more for fall so I am starting with the lightest color—very light and bright yellow—and using each skein up until I get to the darkest. I will also try to get a picture of it to post.

That’s all for this time. If you have stuck with this post all the way to the end, I want to thank you as it is really long! Thank you for reading!

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About susanssnippets

I wear multiple hats: wife of 25+ years, mother, chauffeur/riding companion to DD22 and DS17, daughter/daughter-in-law, crafter, home engineer and too many others to list.
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